Camping with Kids

Dec22

Homemade Christmas Ornaments

Categories // Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Camping with Kids | Tweens | Family | Paper Crafts | Kids Camping Fun! | Painting | Nature Crafts | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Easy Christmas Ornaments for Kids to Make

During the holiday season one fun craft project you can try is to make your own Christmas Ornaments. If your family does not celebrate Christmas, but a different holiday season you can still have a lot of fun making these crafts. These projects can also make excellent gifts for your parents.

Sep27

Leaf Art

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Print Making | Tweens | Family | Kids Camping Fun! | Nature Crafts | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Fall Leaf Arts and Crafts | Make a Leaf Book

As Autumn approaches and the leaves begin to fall off the trees, we start to think about fun fall crafts. Leaf art is a great fall activity, but you don't have to wait for the leaves to fall off the trees to make some leaf art. Below you will read about how to create a leaf print book. To make a little book like this, you will be able to combine a few different types of leaf crafts.

Jul25

Kids Crafts | Paper Chain Garland

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Drawing | Tweens | Print Making | Family | Paper Crafts | Kids Camping Fun! | Painting | Nature Crafts | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Paper Chain Garland


You will need:
- scissors
- glue or double stick tape or stapler
- red, white and green construction paper

Oct09

Camp Games | Scavenger Hunt

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

A great way to introduce your kids to a new campground or camping area.

Take a family trip through nature when you go on this self-designed scavenger hunt.  First, make up a list of things you want to look for.  Then, head out on a nature hike and have each person check off the items they see.  If you'd rather (if you're hiking with smaller kids), search as a team and point out what you see so everyone can take a look.

Aug08

Kids Games | Fun with Maps

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Fun with Maps

If you get tired of being asked “how much farther is it?,” try giving your child their own map.  You can photocopy part of your road map or atlas, then show your child how to use signs and markers to find your location.  If your child is old enough, you can ask them challenging questions like “what’s that mountain range over there?” or “how many miles is it to Round Lake?” 

Aug08

Camp Games | The Listening Game

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play The Listening Game


This is a great campfire game, or a fun thing to do during a day hike break. 

Aug08

Camp Games | Hug-a-tree

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play the Hug-a-tree Game

This game requires two players and one blindfold or bandana.  The players must be old enough to lead one another blindfolded, and you might want to start with some guiding tips—to move slowly, hold the blindfolded person securely by the arm, and use words to guide them over roots and other obstacles.

Aug08

Kids Games | Telephone

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Telephone


This old-fashioned game works best when it’s started off with a sentence that’s either long or complicated—or both. The kids sit in a circle, and one person starts by whispering the sentence in their neighbor’s ear. That person whispers it on to their neighbor, who passes it along until everyone has had a chance to hear and repeat the sentence.

In the end, the last child can repeat the sentence out loud as they heard it, to see if it transformed along the way. It almost always does!

Oct04

Making Apple and Potato Stamps

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Drawing | Tweens | Print Making | Family | Paper Crafts | Kids Camping Fun! | Painting | Nature Crafts | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Making Apple and Potato Stamps


Apple and Potato stamps are an easy way to have fun and create some beautiful art. This project requires relatively few supplies, but will require supervision for younger children.

You will need:
Fresh apples and/or large potatoes (each apple or potato will make two stamps)
Knife
Pen
Paint
Plate
Clean-up Supplies

Start by washing your potatoes and apples well. The first part of this project is the creation of the stamps, which requires the use of a sharp knife. It is important for younger children to be well supervised at this point, it may even be a good idea for an adult to do the steps that involve using a knife.

Step one is to cut the apples and potatoes in half. Make sure the cuts are nice and clean, as any mistakes will be apparent when the apple and potato halves are used as stamps. At this point you can leave the apples halves whole and use them just as apple shaped stamps. You can also use the halves to create more complex stamps.

In order to create a more complex stamp, you start by drawing the outline of the shape into the center of the apple or potato half. Once the outline is clearly drawn in, use the knife to cut the outline into the apple or potato, the cut should be about a quarter of an inch deep. After the outline is cut, carefully carve away the outer edge of the apple or potato away from the outline cut. Make these cuts from the outside in, until you reach the cut of the outline. You will want to cut away about a quarter inch of the apple or potato, leaving just the shape that you drew into the apple or potato as a stamp.

When your stamp is made, pour a small layer of paint into a plate. Spread the paint throughout the base of the plate. You can dip the stamp or apple half into the layer of paint, or you can use a paint brush to apply the paint to the stamp. Then, place the stamp paint side down onto the object you are decorating.

You can use these stamps to decorate clothing, create pictures or anything else that could use some decoration and absorbs paint. When you are planning your project, make sure that you decide what type of object you want to decorate and also make sure you have the correct type of paint for that object.

Aug17

Kids Crafts | Tie Dye

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Drawing | Tweens | Print Making | Family | Paper Crafts | Kids Camping Fun! | Painting | Nature Crafts | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Give Tie Dye a Try

Tie Dying is a great way to spend a day. You have the opportunity to be creative and create a truly unique piece of art. Even better than having a one of a kind piece of art, this is a piece of art that you can wear. When you are preparing to tie dye, you first have to choose what you want to create.  You can make t-shirts, handkerchiefs, sheets, pillow cases and more.

Jul13

Kids Cooking | Sugaring Flowers

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Drawing | Fun food | Tweens | Print Making | Paper Crafts | Sweets and Treats | Family | Painting | Kids Camping Fun! | Kid tested | Nature Crafts | Easy Recipes | Cooking | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School

Learn How to Make Sugared Flowers - Yes you can eat them!

Summertime is a great opportunity to practice some new flower crafts. It's amazing how many different crafts use fresh flowers. You can press flowers, but if you have access to edible flowers, you can enjoy a much sweeter flower craft. Sugaring flowers is a simple, delicious, and fun way to preserve and enjoy edible flowers. Once you have perfected your skills, you can use them to decorate delicious cakes and other food items.

Aug08

Kids Games | Secret Writing

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Secret Writing

If you have more than one kid in the car, have one child close their eyes and put out their hand.  The other child uses their finger to trace a letter on the palm of the out-turned hand.  Try to guess the letter, then trade places.  If the kids are good at guessing, they can try spelling out whole words. 

Aug08

Kids Games | The License Plate Game

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The License Plate Game


This classic game is a staple of all road trips, and it has a few variations.  The easiest version is to ask kids to look for letters of the alphabet, one letter at a time.  They can get the letters from road signs, billboards, and, of course, license plates.  When someone finds “A,” everyone moves on to “B” and so forth.  License plates come in handy for tricky letters like Q, X, and Z! 

Aug08

Camp Games | Artist, Model, Clay

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Camp Games | Family | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play Artist, Model, Clay

This game requires three players and some open space.  One player is designated as the Artist, one as the Model, and one as the Clay.  The artist should close their eyes (or blindfold themselves with a bandana).  The Model then strikes a pose, something that puts their body in an unusual shape. 

Aug08

Leave-No-Trace Camping

Categories // Camping with Kids

Leave-No-Trace Camping


The principles of Leave No Trace are to treat the wilderness the way a courteous visitor would and leave everything just as you found it, with no evidence that you passed through. This is also called “low impact” or “no impact” camping, because your visit makes a minimal impact on the environment. You can carry out these ideals in a number of ways.

Begin by packing out all your litter. Whenever you go camping, take an empty trash bag with you and put all garbage, including toilet paper, into the bag—then take it to a dumpster at the end of the trip. Teach your kids about the garbage bag and make it a game to keep on the lookout for litter to put in the bag.

If you’re going to be camping where there aren’t outhouses, pack up a special toilet kit that will help with your Leave No Trace camping. Keep your toilet paper in a plastic bag. Also, pack a brown paper sack inside another plastic bag. When you go to the bathroom, tuck your used toilet paper into the brown paper bag, then wrap it all up neatly in the plastic bag. Every member of your party can use the same system, or, if you’d rather, everyone can carry their own personal paper bag. The important thing is to not leave any toilet paper strewn across the woods.

Try not to trample vegetation. Whenever you can, stay on established trails and never cut switchbacks or make your own shortcuts (this will lead to erosion and eventual destruction of the trail). When you pitch your tent, try to find a place that’s already bare of plants. If you’re in a group and you have to cross a field that doesn’t have a trail, spread out to minimize your impact. Wherever you go, think about what your heavy shoes or boots are doing to the plants underneath and try to keep damage to a minimum.

Leave what you find. In addition to not leaving litter behind you, it’s important that you not take things away from the wilderness. Rocks, plants, seashells, and arrowheads are all part of the natural landscape. If you take things away, they won’t be there for others to enjoy. Also, many animals find homes and food in abandoned shells and flower-heads, and these are things they would miss if you collected them.

Unless you’re in a campground where wood is provided, avoid campfires. If you’re backpacking, it’s always better to use a camp stove than to burn up wood in a campfire. Fallen limbs and driftwood are important parts of the ecosystem. Animals make their homes under piles of dead wood, and decomposed logs are where baby trees often take root. Many wild areas have been ruined by too many people collecting wood for their campfires. If your campground sells or provides wood, you don’t need to worry. But if you’re in the back-country, camp stoves are always best!

Have respect for wildlife. This means not intruding on a wild animal’s “space” and not feeding it any human food. A good rule to follow is that if your presence is changing the animal’s behavior, you’re too close. Step back, use binoculars or your camera for a closer view, and enjoy watching the animal live its life.
Last but not least, be kind to your fellow campers. That means keeping noise to a minimum, keeping your group small, respecting private property, and camping away from others.

Leave No Trace camping is about being respectful and thoughtful. It’s about honoring the natural world and the creatures that live in it. If you love seeing an untouched mountain stream or a pristine field of wildflowers, then you’ve already taken the first step. Follow these basic practices and you and your family can be models of the Leave No Trace philosophy.


Courtesy of Camping.com
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