Camping with Pre-Schoolers

Dec22

Homemade Christmas Ornaments

Categories // Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Camping with Kids | Tweens | Family | Paper Crafts | Kids Camping Fun! | Painting | Nature Crafts | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Easy Christmas Ornaments for Kids to Make

During the holiday season one fun craft project you can try is to make your own Christmas Ornaments. If your family does not celebrate Christmas, but a different holiday season you can still have a lot of fun making these crafts. These projects can also make excellent gifts for your parents.

Sep27

Leaf Art

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Print Making | Tweens | Family | Kids Camping Fun! | Nature Crafts | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Fall Leaf Arts and Crafts | Make a Leaf Book

As Autumn approaches and the leaves begin to fall off the trees, we start to think about fun fall crafts. Leaf art is a great fall activity, but you don't have to wait for the leaves to fall off the trees to make some leaf art. Below you will read about how to create a leaf print book. To make a little book like this, you will be able to combine a few different types of leaf crafts.

Jul25

Kids Crafts | Paper Chain Garland

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Drawing | Tweens | Print Making | Family | Paper Crafts | Kids Camping Fun! | Painting | Nature Crafts | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Paper Chain Garland


You will need:
- scissors
- glue or double stick tape or stapler
- red, white and green construction paper

Oct09

Camp Games | Scavenger Hunt

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

A great way to introduce your kids to a new campground or camping area.

Take a family trip through nature when you go on this self-designed scavenger hunt.  First, make up a list of things you want to look for.  Then, head out on a nature hike and have each person check off the items they see.  If you'd rather (if you're hiking with smaller kids), search as a team and point out what you see so everyone can take a look.

Aug08

Kids Games | Fun with Maps

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Fun with Maps

If you get tired of being asked “how much farther is it?,” try giving your child their own map.  You can photocopy part of your road map or atlas, then show your child how to use signs and markers to find your location.  If your child is old enough, you can ask them challenging questions like “what’s that mountain range over there?” or “how many miles is it to Round Lake?” 

Aug08

Camp Games | The Listening Game

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play The Listening Game


This is a great campfire game, or a fun thing to do during a day hike break. 

Aug08

Camp Games | Hug-a-tree

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play the Hug-a-tree Game

This game requires two players and one blindfold or bandana.  The players must be old enough to lead one another blindfolded, and you might want to start with some guiding tips—to move slowly, hold the blindfolded person securely by the arm, and use words to guide them over roots and other obstacles.

Aug08

Kids Games | Telephone

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Telephone


This old-fashioned game works best when it’s started off with a sentence that’s either long or complicated—or both. The kids sit in a circle, and one person starts by whispering the sentence in their neighbor’s ear. That person whispers it on to their neighbor, who passes it along until everyone has had a chance to hear and repeat the sentence.

In the end, the last child can repeat the sentence out loud as they heard it, to see if it transformed along the way. It almost always does!

Oct04

Making Apple and Potato Stamps

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Drawing | Tweens | Print Making | Family | Paper Crafts | Kids Camping Fun! | Painting | Nature Crafts | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Making Apple and Potato Stamps


Apple and Potato stamps are an easy way to have fun and create some beautiful art. This project requires relatively few supplies, but will require supervision for younger children.

You will need:
Fresh apples and/or large potatoes (each apple or potato will make two stamps)
Knife
Pen
Paint
Plate
Clean-up Supplies

Start by washing your potatoes and apples well. The first part of this project is the creation of the stamps, which requires the use of a sharp knife. It is important for younger children to be well supervised at this point, it may even be a good idea for an adult to do the steps that involve using a knife.

Step one is to cut the apples and potatoes in half. Make sure the cuts are nice and clean, as any mistakes will be apparent when the apple and potato halves are used as stamps. At this point you can leave the apples halves whole and use them just as apple shaped stamps. You can also use the halves to create more complex stamps.

In order to create a more complex stamp, you start by drawing the outline of the shape into the center of the apple or potato half. Once the outline is clearly drawn in, use the knife to cut the outline into the apple or potato, the cut should be about a quarter of an inch deep. After the outline is cut, carefully carve away the outer edge of the apple or potato away from the outline cut. Make these cuts from the outside in, until you reach the cut of the outline. You will want to cut away about a quarter inch of the apple or potato, leaving just the shape that you drew into the apple or potato as a stamp.

When your stamp is made, pour a small layer of paint into a plate. Spread the paint throughout the base of the plate. You can dip the stamp or apple half into the layer of paint, or you can use a paint brush to apply the paint to the stamp. Then, place the stamp paint side down onto the object you are decorating.

You can use these stamps to decorate clothing, create pictures or anything else that could use some decoration and absorbs paint. When you are planning your project, make sure that you decide what type of object you want to decorate and also make sure you have the correct type of paint for that object.

Aug17

Kids Crafts | Tie Dye

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Drawing | Tweens | Print Making | Family | Paper Crafts | Kids Camping Fun! | Painting | Nature Crafts | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Give Tie Dye a Try

Tie Dying is a great way to spend a day. You have the opportunity to be creative and create a truly unique piece of art. Even better than having a one of a kind piece of art, this is a piece of art that you can wear. When you are preparing to tie dye, you first have to choose what you want to create.  You can make t-shirts, handkerchiefs, sheets, pillow cases and more.

Jul13

Kids Cooking | Sugaring Flowers

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Drawing | Fun food | Tweens | Print Making | Paper Crafts | Sweets and Treats | Family | Painting | Kids Camping Fun! | Kid tested | Nature Crafts | Easy Recipes | Cooking | Art Projects | Kids | Pre-School

Learn How to Make Sugared Flowers - Yes you can eat them!

Summertime is a great opportunity to practice some new flower crafts. It's amazing how many different crafts use fresh flowers. You can press flowers, but if you have access to edible flowers, you can enjoy a much sweeter flower craft. Sugaring flowers is a simple, delicious, and fun way to preserve and enjoy edible flowers. Once you have perfected your skills, you can use them to decorate delicious cakes and other food items.

Aug08

Kids Games | Secret Writing

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Secret Writing

If you have more than one kid in the car, have one child close their eyes and put out their hand.  The other child uses their finger to trace a letter on the palm of the out-turned hand.  Try to guess the letter, then trade places.  If the kids are good at guessing, they can try spelling out whole words. 

Aug08

Kids Games | The License Plate Game

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

The License Plate Game


This classic game is a staple of all road trips, and it has a few variations.  The easiest version is to ask kids to look for letters of the alphabet, one letter at a time.  They can get the letters from road signs, billboards, and, of course, license plates.  When someone finds “A,” everyone moves on to “B” and so forth.  License plates come in handy for tricky letters like Q, X, and Z! 

Aug08

Camp Games | Artist, Model, Clay

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Camp Games | Family | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play Artist, Model, Clay

This game requires three players and some open space.  One player is designated as the Artist, one as the Model, and one as the Clay.  The artist should close their eyes (or blindfold themselves with a bandana).  The Model then strikes a pose, something that puts their body in an unusual shape. 

Aug08

Canoeing with Kids

Categories // Camping with Pre-Schoolers

Canoeing with Kids


If you’re ready to explore nature with your kids, canoeing is a great way to get started.  With everyone happily floating in the canoe, you don’t have to worry about tired feet or weary little legs.  With just a few tips, you and your family can be out on the water in no time.

What to Pack
Bring along sunscreen, drinking water, snacks, a towel or two, jackets, hats with brims, and sunglasses.  If you’re renting your canoe, you’ll be provided with paddles and life jackets.  Ask if you can take out a few extra life jackets to use as seat cushions.

How to Start
Pick a canoeing spot with flat water or very slow-moving river water.  If the day is too windy, skip it—it won’t be a pleasant experience for anyone.  Before you start, put your child in their life jacket (or PDF).  Be sure you have one that’s designed for a child of his/her weight (check the tag on the inside collar).  A child’s PDF should have a floatation collar that will support the head and a crotch strap.  Be sure to size the jacket correctly; if it’s too tight or too loose, it’ll bother your child during the whole trip.

Decide how long to make your trip.  Small kids do best with outings that are an hour or less.  If you really want to take a longer trip, see if there’s a stopping place halfway where everyone can get out and run around.

Getting In
If your child is very small (under three), seat them at the bow, with an adult right behind them.  That way someone can see the child at all times and help keep them involved in what’s going on.  Older kids can sit in the middle of the canoe.  If your kids are older, ask the canoe rental facility if they have any kid-sized paddles.  Even if your little one winds up paddling backwards, they’ll have a good time feeling like they’re helping.
As you get in, keep your body low and step directly onto the centerline of the canoe.  Use your hands to steady yourself along the gunwales (at the sides).  Get one adult settled before you let the kids enter, one at a time.  The last person in is the final adult.  The person in the rear will be responsible for steering and powering the canoe, so this is where you should place the strongest paddler.

On the Water
Do your best to keep things interesting.  Paddle close to shore, where there’s more to look at.  Point out birds and wildlife.  Notice the way drops trickle off the paddle and leave a pattern in the water.  Under supervision, let your child trail his/her hand in the water.  Notice the clouds, the sound of bird song, and sticks or other things in the water.  The more often you go canoeing, the longer your trips can be.  This is a great way for a family to travel!
<<  1 2 3 [45  >>