Camping with Pre-Schoolers

Aug08

Camp Games | Story Circles

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Group Stories | Fun for the Whole Family

There are as many ways to build group stories as there are kids on the planet. When you’ve tried all of these, see if your group can make up a new version that they’ll want to play again and again.

Aug08

Kids Games | Card Games

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Card Games

Depending on the size of your group, you might find that card games are the perfect way to while away the hours.  From smaller group games like gin, gin rummy, king’s corners, war, and old maid to big group games like spoons, a deck of cards can be the answer to your boredom problem.  Challenge the teenagers in your group to learn something tricky like pinochle, bridge, or canasta, or introduce a younger child to the rules of solitaire.  Spoons—a card-game version of musical chairs—is especially good for a group with a little excess energy.

Aug08

Kids Games | Even More Riddles

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Even More Riddles to Stump Your Camp Buddies

Tell these riddles and you'll have everybody scratching their heads!

Aug08

Kids Games | Riddles

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Riddles to Share with Friends

Stump your friends with these tricky riddles!

Aug08

Night Noises

Categories // Camping with Pre-Schoolers

Night Noises


Are you taking your little one on a camping trip for the first time?  Many parts of the camping sleeping experience will be new to your child, from the sleeping bag to the hooting of owls outside.  Discussing these things in advance will allay your child’s fears and help them understand that these are normal parts of the camping experience.

A number of night noises can be scary for kids when they hear them for the first time.  Yipping coyotes, hooting owls, and whirring insects are worrisome noises if you don’t know what they’re all about.  Before you take your trip, spend some time talking about the kinds of animals that live in the area you’re visiting.  Are there bears, coyotes, raccoons, opossums, or other animals that are active at night?  Talk about the kinds of noises these animals might make and explain that this is normal for them—the animals are just out doing what they always do.
 
When you’re talking about night noises, don’t forget the smaller critters like frogs and mosquitoes.  Talk about the way frogs “sing” and explain that there will be more bugs at the campground than you normally have at home.  Mention other night noises that they might hear too, like semi trucks braking on the highway or fog horns blaring in the early morning on coastal inlets.  
Aug03

Kids Games | Word Association

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play the Word Association Game

This game is best—and silliest—when you move quickly, spitting out the first thing that comes into your head.  The first person starts with a word, something like “river.”  The next person says the first thing they think of, say “flow.”  And the next “go.”  And the next “stop,” and so on.  

Aug03

Kids Games | My Aunt Alice

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play the Game - My Aunt Alice

You probably played this classic game yourself when you were a kid.  This is a memory game that works well in the car and is great for elementary and middle-school aged kids.  One kid starts it out by saying, “I went on a trip with my aunt Alice and I took along a ____.”  They fill in the blank with something that starts with the letter A, such as an aardvark.  The next kid repeats this sentence and adds their own addition to the suitcase, something that starts with the letter B.  “I went on a trip with my aunt Alice and I took along an aardvark and a badminton set.”  The third adds something that starts with a C.  “I went on a trip with my aunt Alice and I took along an aardvark, a badminton set, and a cupcake.”  Continue on for as long as you can or until you reach the end of the alphabet.

Aug08

Kids Games | Story Circles

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play the Game - Story Circles

There are as many ways to build group stories as there are kids on the planet.  When you’ve tried all of these, see if your group can make up a new version that they’ll want to play again and again.  To begin a chain story, one person starts with a conditional sentence (something that starts with the word “if”), such as “If my bike gets a flat, I’ll have to walk.”  The second person picks up the second half of the sentence and adds something of their own, like “If I have to walk, I’ll take my dog.”  Then the third, “If I take my dog, we can get ice cream.”  Keep going until you get bored, or until everyone has had at least two chances to add to the story, then start again with something new.

Aug08

Kids Games | Ongoing Riddles

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play the Ongoing Riddle Game

Ongoing riddles are a great way to entertain a group, whether you’re on a hike, in the car, or just milling around camp.  Start one of these puzzles at the beginning of your trip—they’re tough and it might take the whole time to solve it!  These are best for kids aged ten and up. 

Aug08

Kids Games | More Riddles

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

More Riddles to Share with Your Camping Pals

Here are more riddles that you can use to confound your friends.
 

Aug08

Tent Camping

Categories // Camping with Pre-Schoolers

Tent Camping


For little ones, camping is all about trying new things.  There are new animals to see, trails to explore, and fun adventures to try.  But there can also be some challenges inherent in taking your child out of its usual routine.  You’ll make the trip better for everyone if you spend some time before hand, talking about what camping is like—specifically, what sleeping in a tent or RV is like.  

Test Runs
If you can, let your child test out their sleeping bag at home before the trip.  They can use the sleeping bag in their own bed and get used to climbing in and out of it.  If you’ll be camping in a tent, you can pitch the tent in your back yard and do a “test run,” sleeping a night or two out in the tent.  That will help everything seem more normal—and more fun—when the actual camping trip arrives.

Bathroom Visits
One of the most challenging things about camping is getting up in the middle of the night.  There are no lights to turn on, and bathrooms can be far away.  Talk in advance about what your child should do if he or she has to go to the bathroom in the night.  Is there a flashlight they can have right next to their bed?  Should they wake you up?  Be sure to take a family trip to the bathroom right before bed, and avoid giving your child a lot of liquids in the hour or two leading up to bed time. 

With a little preparation, your child will know what to expect when it comes to sleeping on your camping trip.  Be sure to start slow, with settings that are as comfortable for your child as possible.  Before you know it, you’ll have worked your way up to sleeping underneath the stars!
Aug03

Kids Games | Who am I?

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Who am I?

This is a guessing game for older kids or adults. One person, the “lead,” starts by thinking of the name of a person, either real or fictional, dead or alive—but with a first and last name, such as Nancy Drew. They announce to the group “my first name starts with N.” The group gets busy thinking of famous people whose first names start with N, like Napoleon Bonaparte, Nora Roberts, Nicholas Cage, Nancy Reagan—but they keep these names to themselves.

The person who thought of Napoleon then comes up with a question that fits Napoleon’s life, something like “Did you try to conquer Europe?” They voice their question out loud. If the lead can think of the person they have in mind—or any famous person for whom the answer to the question is yes—they can answer “No, I’m not Napoleon.” They’ve managed to defend their person’s identity for the moment and someone else takes a turn. If they can’t think of anyone who fits the question, then the person who asked it gets to ask one question about their person (Nancy Drew), something like “are you living?” “Are you fictional?” “Are you a woman,” etc.
If the lead is able to come up with a person who fits the question—but it isn’t who the asker had in mind—the lead’s secret name is still defended. The asker can then come up with another question that fits the name they had in mind.

After the lead successfully defends themselves, someone else can take a turn. For instance, the person who thought of Nicholas Cage might try to think of the most obscure fact they know about the actor, in order to stump the lead. So instead of asking “Are you a famous actor?” they might say, “Were you in Raising Arizona?” If the lead can’t answer, they get to ask a pointed question about the lead’s name.

Because this game takes a lot of thought and planning, it isn’t necessary that the players go in order. If one person has a lot of questions ready to ask and no one else has any, go ahead and let the person ask, since this keeps the game moving forward. This is a fun game to play with mixed generations, since some will know all about Harry Potter while others are well versed in the lives of Mickey Mantle and Doris Day.

Aug03

Kids Games | I Spy

Categories // Camping with Kids | Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Car Games | Rainy Day Games | Tweens | Family | Camp Games | Kids Camping Fun! | Games | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

How to Play I Spy

This is a standard of children’s car trips.  One person looks out the window—or right inside the car—and picks out something they can see.  They formulate a true sentence that includes a clue about what they see, such as “I spy with my little eye something that’s blue.”  The other player tries to guess what they had in mind.  The beauty of this game is that the other player can guess as many times as they like, making it a great game for small children.  Once the item is found, the roles reverse and the other person can choose the secret item and say “I spy with my little eye….”

<<  1 2 3 4 [5