Articles tagged with: camping with kids

Jun27

Kids Camping Guide | Michigan

Categories // Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Camping with Kids | US State Activity Guides for Camping with Kids | Tweens | Family | Kids Camping Fun! | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Kids Camping Guide | Michigan

Kids-dad-rv-michigan

Top 10 Things for Kids to Do in Michigan | Michigan is a truly beautiful state, filled with plenty of recreational activities, as well as attractions and more.

Jan19

Best Goony Golf Courses

Categories // Family

Best Goony Golf Courses

mini-golf
Plan Some Fun Family Time with a Round of Goony Golf | Goony Golf is a fun form of miniature golf, but has goofy and fun courses. You can find these fun courses throughout the country. Keep an eye out for miniature golf courses that have fun themes, storybook characters and other goofy themes. Here are a couple fun Goony Golf courses.

Aug08

Tent Camping

Categories // Camping with Pre-Schoolers

Tent Camping


For little ones, camping is all about trying new things.  There are new animals to see, trails to explore, and fun adventures to try.  But there can also be some challenges inherent in taking your child out of its usual routine.  You’ll make the trip better for everyone if you spend some time before hand, talking about what camping is like—specifically, what sleeping in a tent or RV is like.  

Test Runs
If you can, let your child test out their sleeping bag at home before the trip.  They can use the sleeping bag in their own bed and get used to climbing in and out of it.  If you’ll be camping in a tent, you can pitch the tent in your back yard and do a “test run,” sleeping a night or two out in the tent.  That will help everything seem more normal—and more fun—when the actual camping trip arrives.

Bathroom Visits
One of the most challenging things about camping is getting up in the middle of the night.  There are no lights to turn on, and bathrooms can be far away.  Talk in advance about what your child should do if he or she has to go to the bathroom in the night.  Is there a flashlight they can have right next to their bed?  Should they wake you up?  Be sure to take a family trip to the bathroom right before bed, and avoid giving your child a lot of liquids in the hour or two leading up to bed time. 

With a little preparation, your child will know what to expect when it comes to sleeping on your camping trip.  Be sure to start slow, with settings that are as comfortable for your child as possible.  Before you know it, you’ll have worked your way up to sleeping underneath the stars!
Aug06

Camping Fun for Kids of all Ages

Categories // Rainy Day Games

 kids camping in a hammock

Camping Fun for Kids

KidsCamping is a great new site dedicated to collecting and publishing ideas and articles to make camping with you kids even more fun and exciting.  Whether you are inroducing you toddler or teen to camping we've got ideas and advice for a great camping trip.  Passing on the love of camping is one of the greatest gifts we can give to our kids or grandkids.  You have our promise that this site is safe for kids of all ages.

Jun22

Kids Camping Guide | Washington

Categories // Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Camping with Kids | US State Activity Guides for Camping with Kids | Tweens | Family | Kids Camping Fun! | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Kids Camping Guide | Washington

kids-seattle-fountain

Top 10 Things for Kids to Do in Washington | Washington is a stunningly beautiful state, filled with plenty of recreational activities, as well as attractions and more.

Jun07

Kids Camping Guide | New York

Categories // Camping with Pre-Schoolers | Camping with Kids | US State Activity Guides for Camping with Kids | Tweens | Family | Kids Camping Fun! | Kids | Pre-School | Boys | Girls

Kids Camping Guide | New York

kids-new-york-fireworks

Kids Guide to New York | Top 10 Things for Kids to Do In New York | New York is an amazingly diverse state. Visitors can enjoy the natural beauty of the Catskills to the excitement of the big city in New York City.

Aug08

Leave-No-Trace Camping

Categories // Camping with Kids

Leave-No-Trace Camping


The principles of Leave No Trace are to treat the wilderness the way a courteous visitor would and leave everything just as you found it, with no evidence that you passed through. This is also called “low impact” or “no impact” camping, because your visit makes a minimal impact on the environment. You can carry out these ideals in a number of ways.

Begin by packing out all your litter. Whenever you go camping, take an empty trash bag with you and put all garbage, including toilet paper, into the bag—then take it to a dumpster at the end of the trip. Teach your kids about the garbage bag and make it a game to keep on the lookout for litter to put in the bag.

If you’re going to be camping where there aren’t outhouses, pack up a special toilet kit that will help with your Leave No Trace camping. Keep your toilet paper in a plastic bag. Also, pack a brown paper sack inside another plastic bag. When you go to the bathroom, tuck your used toilet paper into the brown paper bag, then wrap it all up neatly in the plastic bag. Every member of your party can use the same system, or, if you’d rather, everyone can carry their own personal paper bag. The important thing is to not leave any toilet paper strewn across the woods.

Try not to trample vegetation. Whenever you can, stay on established trails and never cut switchbacks or make your own shortcuts (this will lead to erosion and eventual destruction of the trail). When you pitch your tent, try to find a place that’s already bare of plants. If you’re in a group and you have to cross a field that doesn’t have a trail, spread out to minimize your impact. Wherever you go, think about what your heavy shoes or boots are doing to the plants underneath and try to keep damage to a minimum.

Leave what you find. In addition to not leaving litter behind you, it’s important that you not take things away from the wilderness. Rocks, plants, seashells, and arrowheads are all part of the natural landscape. If you take things away, they won’t be there for others to enjoy. Also, many animals find homes and food in abandoned shells and flower-heads, and these are things they would miss if you collected them.

Unless you’re in a campground where wood is provided, avoid campfires. If you’re backpacking, it’s always better to use a camp stove than to burn up wood in a campfire. Fallen limbs and driftwood are important parts of the ecosystem. Animals make their homes under piles of dead wood, and decomposed logs are where baby trees often take root. Many wild areas have been ruined by too many people collecting wood for their campfires. If your campground sells or provides wood, you don’t need to worry. But if you’re in the back-country, camp stoves are always best!

Have respect for wildlife. This means not intruding on a wild animal’s “space” and not feeding it any human food. A good rule to follow is that if your presence is changing the animal’s behavior, you’re too close. Step back, use binoculars or your camera for a closer view, and enjoy watching the animal live its life.
Last but not least, be kind to your fellow campers. That means keeping noise to a minimum, keeping your group small, respecting private property, and camping away from others.

Leave No Trace camping is about being respectful and thoughtful. It’s about honoring the natural world and the creatures that live in it. If you love seeing an untouched mountain stream or a pristine field of wildflowers, then you’ve already taken the first step. Follow these basic practices and you and your family can be models of the Leave No Trace philosophy.


Courtesy of Camping.com
Aug08

Night Noises

Categories // Camping with Pre-Schoolers

Night Noises


Are you taking your little one on a camping trip for the first time?  Many parts of the camping sleeping experience will be new to your child, from the sleeping bag to the hooting of owls outside.  Discussing these things in advance will allay your child’s fears and help them understand that these are normal parts of the camping experience.

A number of night noises can be scary for kids when they hear them for the first time.  Yipping coyotes, hooting owls, and whirring insects are worrisome noises if you don’t know what they’re all about.  Before you take your trip, spend some time talking about the kinds of animals that live in the area you’re visiting.  Are there bears, coyotes, raccoons, opossums, or other animals that are active at night?  Talk about the kinds of noises these animals might make and explain that this is normal for them—the animals are just out doing what they always do.
 
When you’re talking about night noises, don’t forget the smaller critters like frogs and mosquitoes.  Talk about the way frogs “sing” and explain that there will be more bugs at the campground than you normally have at home.  Mention other night noises that they might hear too, like semi trucks braking on the highway or fog horns blaring in the early morning on coastal inlets.  
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